• Squaring Wall Quilts with Lynette Jensen

    Lynette Jensen is back with another lovely quilt pattern from the Thimbleberries Project of the Month Club! This wall quilt (or holiday table topper) is called Winterscape and it’s an easy project that looks great all winter long! Here’s what Lynette had to say about it… How fun to have a small, easy project for the December installment of the Project of the Month. Not only can you get this Winterscape project made in this busy month for you to use in your own holiday decorating, but you could also make extra for gift giving. It is the perfect size for many uses – as a wall hanging in a…

  • Quilt Lessons: How to Make a Sleeve for Wall Hanging Quilts

    Tis the season of wintery wall quilts! Not every quilt is meant to keep us warm; some are made to be exhibited and others are made to spice up home décor as they spread cheer to all who gaze upon them. But, how do you hang a wall quilt? My favorite way is to make a hanging sleeve that can be attached to the back of the quilt. If you’ve ever made a wall hanging quilt, you know it can be difficult to find instructions about how to make a hanging sleeve. In researching for this, I explored books, blog posts, and videos looking for instructions to share. My favorite…

  • Create Fabric Paintings using Pre-cut Quilt Kits

    Ready to give picture quilts a try? My favorite way to create fabric paintings is to layer fabric shapes using fusible appliqué. It can be quite time consuming to iron fusible to your fabric and to cut out the various appliqué shapes. Now that laser pre-cut quilt kits are available, quilting images is easier than ever! What’s a laser pre-cut quilt kit? If you’re not familiar with these handy appliqué kits, you’re missing out! The kits include pre-cut fabrics with the fusible web already ironed in place. The fabrics have also been laser cut into the smaller, more intricate shapes required by the pattern. Small tabs keep the various cut…

  • designing a quilt tea

    Designing a Quilt with a Tea Theme

    Welcome to our tea party! Today our theme is about designing a quilt with a tea theme, inspired by the Thirties Tea Quilt by Diane Nagle of Peddlecar Quilts for RJR Fabrics. We have some tips from Diane, a schematic for a Broken Dishes mug rug based on the quilt, and other tea-themed quilt designs. So have a seat at the table and let’s get started. Inspiration for Designing a quilt Diane’s exclusive design for Keepsake Quilting features teapots, cherries, Broken Dishes blocks, star blocks and a center design of a bird preparing a cup of tea. All are made with piecing or applique using 1930s reproduction fabrics from RJR. Diane says,…

  • river rock block of the month

    Benefits of BOMs (Block of the Month Quilts)

    Do you have UFOs piling up? Do you want to make a large quilt but don’t think you have the time? Or you want to get started quilting but the thought of a big project overwhelms you? Or maybe the cost of purchasing all that fabric at once doesn’t fit your budget. What if I told you there was a way to create a quilt a little at a time, and a gentle pace, with like-minded people. There is, and it’s called Block of the Month (BOM) quilts. How Block of the Month works: You receive the materials for one block at a time each month for a period of months…

  • flying geese stars cheddar quilt

    Why Cheddar Quilts are Popular Again

    Whether you like bright orange or hate it, you have to admit, cheddar quilts are striking. As with any color or style of quilt, cheddar quilts have had their moments in the sun, and the last few years we’ve seen their popularity grow once again. So what are cheddar quilts and why are they called that? And what’s caused the resurgence? Noted quilter, author, and fabric designer Pepper Cory explained all this and a lot more in an article for Quilters Newsletter in 2014, and what she wrote then still holds true: “Before 1990, [cheddar] was often referred to as just bright orange or gold. For years, the shade we now…

  • pre-cut quilt kit

    How to Make a Quilt Without Cutting or Math

    From the time I first became aware of quilting, as an adolescent, it’s been my dream to make a quilt in the Double Wedding Ring (DWR) pattern. I not only loved the design, but the name sounded so romantic. This was back in the 1970s, when quilting experienced a revival and hope chests were still a thing. It wasn’t too long after that that I learned two things: how to sew and that I did not have an aptitude for math. Spatial skills? Also not a strong suit. The first pillowcases and place mats went all right, but when I moved on to patterns, frustration set in. I always ended…

  • mary's scrap bag quilt pattern

    Top 10 Reasons Why We Love Quilting

    Today is National Quilting Day! Here at Keepsake Quilting we’re celebrating with the Top 10 reasons why we–as a nation of quilters–love to quilt. We asked you on our Facebook page why you like to quilt, and your answers helped us make this list. Read, enjoy, and let us know what you think. Reason 1: The Fabric Let’s face it–from pretty pastel prints to deep, dark batiks, we’ve never met a fabric we didn’t like. Tips for choosing quilt fabric: Make sure the fabric is colorfast. If you’re not sure, wash it before you use it. (Actually, many quilters recommend pre-washing all fabric, especially if the quilt will be functional…

  • quilt fabric strips

    We Love the Keepsake Quilting Staff–and They Love You

    Happy Employee Appreciation Day! We’d like to this opportunity to introduce you to some of the many people who work at Keepsake Quilting and give you some insight on what they do. It takes a team of dedicated staff–most of whom live within a few miles of our New Hampshire store–to bring you the best in fabric, quilt kits, notions, tools, and so much more. Let’s meet some of them now. Heather, Cutting Room We start in our cutting room, where each staff member is responsible for cutting fabric in the amount or size to match the project. Cutters like Heather train for 2-3 months, working with a more experienced…

  • neutral value quilt kit

    How to Use Value in Quilt Design

    Of all the quilt design principles, value is one of the most difficult to grasp. Value is the lightness or darkness of a color, from the palest version to the most intense. An easy example of value is the free paint chip strips you get at the hardware store: pick up a reddish-orange one and you’ll see 4-5 shades, from pink grapefruit to tiger lily to roasted pepper to brick cottage. The same goes for quilt fabric. It comes in a huge range of values. However, quilters often find that when they build their stash, most of the fabric falls into the middle-value range, with little at the top and…